The 17 m. Kestrel features camber-changing flaps that operate in conjunction with the ailerons, airbrakes, drogue chute, water ballast and retractable gear. The fuselage is a fiberglass monocoque (not sandwich) for greater resilience and pilot protection. The cockpit has room enough for a 198 cm / 6 ft pilot and features a control stick that…

The H 201 Standard Class version of the flapped H 301 Libelle first flew in 1967. It originally had a fixed landing gear; but with a change in the Standard Class rules, a retractable gear (H 201B) became standard. The B model features larger uppersurface dive brakes, a larger stabilizer for better low-speed handling, PVC…

Designed for the 15 m. racing class, the Mosquito first flew in 1976 as a flapped refinement of the Standard Class 206 Hornet. It features trailing edge dive brakes and interconnected variable camber trailing edge flaps, and has automatic connection on ailerons, elevater, air brakes and water ballast plumbing. ATC

The Libelle first flew in 1964 and quickly revolutionized competitive soaring. It spearheaded the fiberglass take-over in American competition flying, becoming the first fiberglass sailplane to receive an U.S. ATC. In 1969 Soaring magazine readers voted the Libelle the World’s most beautiful sailplane and the one they would most like to own. The H 301…

The 17 m. Kestrel features camber-changing flaps that operate in conjunction with the ailerons, airbrakes, drogue chute, water ballast and retractable gear. The fuselage is a fiberglass monocoque (not sandwich) for greater resilience and pilot protection. The cockpit has room enough for a 198 cm / 6 ft pilot and features a control stick that…

Designed for the typical sport pilot rather than the competition pilot or record seeker, the Club Libelle is an outgrowth of the Standard Libelle design. Double-taper wings raised to the shoulder position provide greater clearance on landouts. The wings carry broad-span trailing edge flaps for approach control. The landing gear is fixed and a T-tail…

The BS-1 was designed and built in 1962 by an Akaflieg Braunschweig student Bjorn Stender to the order of a South African soaring pilot and industrialist. Following the death of Stender in a flight test accident the next year Glasflugel took over the project and manufactured the production version. The BS-1 won the world 300…

604

The 604 was a 22 m. span development of the Kestrel 17. First flying early in 1970, it finished sixth in the 1970 World Championships at Marfa, and also came second in the Open Class at the 1974 World Championships at Waikerie, Australia. Originally intended as a development vehicle for a two-seat high performance sailplane,…

304

The Glasflugel 304, which first flew in 1980, was the 15-meter racing class successor to the 303 Mosquito. Is features Glasflugel trailing edge dice brakes and interconnected variable camber flaps, a parrallogram control stick, T-tail with fixed stabilizer and elevator, and automatic connection on assembly of all flight control